notasupernaturalfanpage:

Her is a feminist film. I’ve said this to many friends in the past few days. I’ve gotten three reactions. The first is from fellow feminists. They tend to say “Oh my god, I know I was so worried with that one scene and then I was so happy.” The second is from people who don’t care about feminism…

You know what’s weird about HER, though? I really really would have liked to see Amy Adams’ character being friends with her computer much more than Sam and Theodore, I think. Or at least as much as. Sure we get a little bit of that, but it would have been so cool to see Amy (the character) growing from being friends with a positive female force, in a way that her relationship with Charles wasn’t giving her (even though Charles was *trying* to support her). I dunno - it would have been great to see that girl-bond that helped her.

I just find myself dreaming about their relationship. The bro-mance of girls. 

booksandquills:

Literary Playlists.

Here are some of my favourite bookish songs/playlists + suggestions from the comments.

Wuthering Heights
The Ghost of Genova Heights by Stars
Playlist - Volume I. 
Devil’s Resting Place by Laura Marling

The Virgin Suicides
Hanging Out With the Lisbon Sisters Playlist.
Electra Heart by Marina and the Diamonds 
8 Tracks Playlist 

Steinbeck
Timshel by Mumford and Sons (East of Eden)
Dust Bowl Dance by Mumford and Sons (Grapes of Wrath)

Eleanor & Park
Rainbow Rowell Playlists

Shakespeare
Poet by Bastille (Sonnet 18)
Sigh No More by Mumford and Sons (Much Ado About Nothing)

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
The Weight of Living Part 1 by Bastille

Divergent
Veronica Roth’s Playlist

theparisreview:

“When Mercedes was older, he told her: ‘You should marry me because I’m going to be very important.’ I think he knew all along.”
Read part two of Silvana Paternostro’s oral biography of Gabriel García Márquez.

theparisreview:

“When Mercedes was older, he told her: ‘You should marry me because I’m going to be very important.’ I think he knew all along.”

Read part two of Silvana Paternostro’s oral biography of Gabriel García Márquez.

feru-leru:

London Grammar - Sights (Official Video)

writersnoonereads:

The stories of R. A. Lafferty are returning to print*, though in small editions: Centipede Press will publish his collected stories as limited-edition hardcovers — up to 12 volumes — starting with The Man Who Made Models. Centipede says:

In a career that began in 1959 and continued until his death in 2002, R.A. Lafferty garnered the admiration of authors and editors including Robert A.W. Lowndes, Harlan Ellison, A.A. Attanasio, Gene Wolfe, Michael Swanwick and many, many others. His body of short fiction is comprised of well over 200 stories and, despite his vast popularity, there was never a concerted effort made to produce a comprehensive collection of his short fiction, until now. 

Welcome to the first volume in a series that will run to a dozen volumes collecting all of R.A. Lafferty’s short fiction. Whether it be well-known stories such as “Narrow Valley” or more obscure work such as “The Man Who Made Models,” all will be collected here in the Lafferty Library. Each volume will feature close to 100,000 words of Lafferty’s fiction and each volume will feature an afterword by series editor John Pelan and a guest introduction by a notable author in the field of fantastic fiction. 

These scans are from the 50 Watts hoard (the cover art for Nine Hundred Grandmothers is by Leo & Diane Dillon). No word when or if Lafferty’s novels will be reprinted. I love Past Master (1968) — it’s science fiction but the main character is Thomas More — and my copy is in tatters.

Here also is the bio from Centipede's site: 

R.A. Lafferty (1914–2002) was an American science fiction and fantasy writer known for his original use of language, metaphor, and narrative structure, as well as for his etymological wit. He also wrote a set of four autobiographical novels, In a Green Tree, a history book, The Fall of Rome, and a number of novels that could be more or less loosely called historical fiction. Lafferty’s quirky prose drew from traditional storytelling styles, largely from the Irish and Native American, and his shaggy-dog characters and tall tales are unique in science fiction. Little of Lafferty’s writing is considered typical of the genre.

*The first volume is already sold out (at least from the publisher). When I drafted this post last week it was still available. Kind of sad.

@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook

leebarguss:

Architecture (by Sunga Park)

(via itsdeepforhappypeople)

I hate people that ask ‘why do you do that?’ And you’re like ‘what?’ And they’re like ‘that little personal quirk you have that makes you you and distinguishes you from the millions of other assholes walking around on this earth. Because I’ve noticed that you’re different and you might want to change that.’

(Source: juvenilius, via mcry)

explore-blog:

For Charlotte Brontë's birthday, Jane, the Fox & Me – a lovely graphic novel about the travails of youth, inspired by Jane Eyre

explore-blog:

For Charlotte Brontë's birthday, Jane, the Fox & Me – a lovely graphic novel about the travails of youth, inspired by Jane Eyre

prince-warp:

sticks and stones may break my bones but words constitute my entire existence and my ability to meaningfully interact with the universe because we live in a textual reality in which everything is constructed and coded by language there is no escaping the symbolic dimensions of it there is nothing outside the text there is nothing outside the text there is nothing outside the text 

(via jaimelannister)

labyrinth-queen:

Transport drawing progression.

I would love to send shit like this to a friend/lover. It’s - oh hey- I whipped up a beautiful flower drawing it only took time/effort/money/love/heart/confidence/tearsbciwasworrieditwouldsuck/andmybodyandsoul. No big deal.